Celebrate “Take our Daughters & Sons to Work Day!”



One of the best ways to educate our youth on the variety of different and exciting careers is by showing them these professions firsthand. This upcoming April 23, 2020, is a day celebrated across the nation as “Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Day.” This is a day to enjoy with one’s youth and open their eyes to the different opportunities out there.

What exactly does this day mean for our youth? How was it originally developed, and what are its intentions today? “Take our Daughters & Sons to Work Day” was developed to help empower girls and boys in all sectors of society to overcome adversity and reach their full potential. This was developed through The Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Foundation, which creates innovative strategies and research-based activities in informal educational programs. Through its leadership, expertise, and collaborations, the Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Foundation advocates for changes in social policy and public awareness on behalf of youth.

How does this simple day help go beyond simply “shadowing” an adult? Designed to be more than a career day, the Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work program goes beyond just watching what one’s parents do at work. The program exposes girls and boys to all aspects of what a parent or mentor in their lives does during the workday. More importantly, it showcases the value of their education, helping them to realize the power and possibilities associated with a balanced work and family life. The program also helps youth by allowing them to begin steps toward their end goals in a hands-on and interactive environment, which is key to their achieving success.

Is this celebration only limited to the single day of April 23rd? What is unique about this celebration is that it does not have to be limited to one day. The programs and activities that have been designed by the foundation can encourage scholars to begin researching possible careers much earlier than April 23rd. For educators, the foundation can help their students by creating a unique learning experience that incorporates practical applications of their studies (such as math, English, and science), and encouraging them to take an active role in their education. Ultimately, this program can enhance students’ interests and approaches to learning.

For interested companies, the foundation can help through a variety of ways. Firstly, the foundation has developed activities to help assist in planning a successful day. The foundation has also developed a “toolkit” for companies to use to promote the day to their employees. One thing the foundation does that can greatly help a company get started is it shows examples of how certain industries may participate in the day. For example, for those involved in the payroll aspect of a company, the foundation suggests “a member of the payroll department demonstrates how employees get paid.” Afterward, the same employee can “explain how time off is factored in (sick/personal/vacation), federal and state deductions, and savings plan deductions.” The foundation also can help an interested company by suggesting specific handouts for certain departments. Regarding the payroll example, they suggest handouts such as sample timesheets and paychecks.

How can interested parents or mentors participate if their company or workplace is not participating in this? If one is interested, the foundation has the full details about this year’s program through its website. The theme for this year is “Meet the Workplace Superstars.” The foundation can help interested parents/mentors by showcasing the tools that will help initiate conversations with one’s daughter, son, relative, or sponsor/mentee around work. The foundation also has created family-friendly activities that can be implemented if one is planning their own program, as well as a toolkit for parents and mentors with everything needed to prepare for the big day.

For more information, visit the Take Our Daughters & Sons to Work Foundation website at daughtersandsonstowork.org.

 


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