Natural Remedies for Dogs



In the initial feelings of helplessness and indecision to take the family dog to the vet, many dog owners may choose to wait.  What if you could act immediately after discovering your four-legged friend has a difficulty?  Home remedies are not just useful for people.  With the correct ingredient, dogs can benefit in various ways from a fast-acting solution.  One of the following suggestions may be a time saver for your family pet.

Calming:  A prescription of the calming herb chamomile can aid a dog who acts nervous or is stressed.  For one cup of water, allow three tea bags of chamomile to steep for about 15 minutes; then, cool and strain.  Based on a ¼ teaspoon per 30 pounds of body weight, pour the tea over dog food, into the water dish, or given through a syringe.  Place the remaining tea in the refrigerator for no longer than two days.

Flea Prevention:Diatomaceous earth, DE, is a natural substance which contains silicon, calcium, sodium, and magnesium.  It acts as a desiccant by absorbing water and causing bugs, especially fleas, to dehydrate and die.  While the application is dusty, pet owners can apply DE to pet beds.  Be sure to apply outside, use gloves and a dust mask. Do not breathe in the dust, and allow the pet beds time to air out, outside.

Warning:  There is insubstantial information to suggest diatomaceous earth is safe as a topical for animals.

Tip:  Spread DE around the foundation of your home and entry points.

Skin and Coat Problems:  When the skin becomes red, blotchy, or your pet experiences the need to scratch constantly, one topical commonly used is oatmeal.  Cook the oats according to the instructions without the use of butter.  Once cooled, insert the cooked oatmeal inside a sock or nylon stocking.  With the remaining liquid, pour into the bath water; then, using the soak, work the oatmeal into the animal’s coat.  If five minutes can be tolerated, congratulate your four-legged pet.  Rinse the excess oatmeal out of the coat and towel dry. The process can be repeated.

A second topical used to treat skin allergies, and irritations and burns is aloe vera. (Tip: Using a plant will provide better results; however, if purchased, make sure it does not contain alcohol.)  Before applying, make sure the area is well cleaned with mild soap and dried.

Warning:  Ingesting aloe vera can cause results similar to the effects of a strong laxative; therefore, to prevent licking, try using a t-shirt.

Tip: Cooled chamomile tea can be sprayed onto a dog to soothe irritated areas, hot spots, or rashes.

Motion Sickness:  Riding in the car may not be a happy occasion for all pets. One natural solution to foster enjoyment in the mobile activity is to use ginger, no more than a tablespoon. Dog owners can purchase a ginger dog treat or make their own.

Tip: Test out the remedy by giving your dog ginger and taking him or her on a short car ride.

Poisoned:  In addition to nuts, avocados, chocolate, caffeine, and foods which contain a high content of salt, grapes are also a toxic food for dogs. Even one can potentially result in kidney failure with the symptoms of dehydration, weakness, diarrhea, and vomiting. The time-saving solution is to take a syringe of three percent hydrogen peroxide into the back of the dog’s mouth to ensure the content is swallowed.  The process of vomiting should take no more than 15 minutes. If the dog has not vomited, administer the second syringe of hydrogen peroxide; otherwise, call a veterinarian to receive instructions.

Tip:  Post the after-hours veterinarian number among your contacts or on your refrigerator.

Not all situations can be treated with home remedies.  If the problem has been occurring for more than 48 hours or has not improved, it is time to seek veterinary assistance.

 


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