Southern Signature Properties The Touch of Hospitality



What do you think of when you see a pineapple? Some kind of mixed drink? A fruit platter at a brunch or picnic? The great debate over whether it is good on a pizza? How about a tropical environment? But has a pineapple ever made you think about real estate or owning a home? What if you found out the pineapple is the symbol at the core of a growing real estate team here in the Triad?

The rise of the pineapple as a symbol of hospitality came about because of its rarity in Colonial times. The first recorded encounter between a European and a pineapple was when Christopher Columbus, in the winter of 1493, dropped anchor and went ashore to investigate a deserted village.  Following this initial encounter, the popularity of the fruit spread as merchant sailors returned to the ports along the east coast with the sweet treat. Unfortunately, it was rare that the delicious fruit made it to port before rotting, therefore increasing its appeal. In the American colonies, homes served as the heart of community activity. Visiting was the primary means of entertainment, cultural exchange and news sharing. The concept of hospitality was a central element of the society at the time. Women took great care in their choice of centerpiece for their tables during these gatherings. If you were greeted by a pineapple-topped display of food, you knew the hostess spared no expense in making you feel welcome in her family’s home. Over hundreds of years, the pineapple has stood the test of time and become a symbol of hospitality, not only in the South, but across the country and internationally.

So when the ladies of Southern Signature Properties, Alison Vannoy, Jenny Edwards and Renea Burgess, were searching for something to express their real estate company’s philosophy of treating their clients as they would want to be treated, the symbol of the pineapple was the perfect choice.

“When we joined as a team, we wanted to focus on allowing our buyers to be welcomed into the house they are looking at or providing the tools to our sellers to welcome potential buyers into their homes. Many times there are houses on the market that may get overlooked, but with attention to details, it can be warmed up and made perfect for the next person looking for just the right place. At Southern Signature Properties, we want to provide the best photography, marketing and service to each and every listing we have,” said Alison. The difference with Southern Signature Properties and their approach to real estate is one that simply begins with a commitment to making a difference in people’s lives.

“Helping our clients see what makes their property special is where we begin,” said Jenny.   “Accenting the unique qualities of each home and getting them to shine through can make a difference in how a house is seen by others.  Whether it’s repair work, attention to the landscaping or staging to get the vision right, we understand what it takes to creatively market a home.” These ladies also know that every seller and buyer has a story, as does their home, and sharing that story also makes a difference.

“Our clients have in their minds the type of home they want,’ said Renea. “Whether that is in a tree lined neighborhood, a no-maintenance community, a historic district, a rural setting…getting to know our clients and what they are looking for begins from our first meeting. For us, it’s about one client’s experience at a time. Not focusing on numbers, but making sure that each client has the best experience possible is what we are about at Southern Signature Properties. If you think back about the original meaning of our logo, the pineapple, it was to give visitors a sense of caring and welcome. A great symbol to live up to every day in our business and interactions with our clients.”

For a personalized approach to buying or selling, contact Southern Signature Properties. They are located at 3720 Vest Mill Road, Winston-Salem, NC. Call 336-749-5388 to schedule an appointment. Follow on Facebook or visit livesouthernnc.com.


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