The ART Beat of Forsyth Woman: Holly Linville Evans | Artist



Photo by Alison Shermeta Photography

A Monthly Column That Keeps Its Finger on the Pulse Of Forsyth’s Artists and Their Inspiring Stories

This month’s featured artist, Holly Linville Evans, takes one part Camel City heritage and one part preschool aged whimsy and mixes them into a joy filled art scene that takes her viewer into the canvas with her. Holly has learned not to take herself too seriously, embracing flaws and coming out a stronger artist on the other side.

Holly Linville Evans | Artist

How would you describe your work?

I would describe my art as happy, joy-filled, playful and colorful. I take pride in every piece that is created; however, the process of creating is the most satisfying to me. The use of different mediums allows me to learn new techniques, continue to evolve, create depth and meaning in each piece, and add layers of joy.

What influences your art most?

I am a preschool teacher by day and an artist by night. My art is influenced and inspired by my daily experiences with the preschoolers who are both inquisitive and unencumbered with their imaginations. When I get time at night to be in my art space, I will often spend time processing my day spent with a classroom full of two-year-olds and their “big emotion” moments as I create the many layers to my work.

Why is Winston-Salem a city worth painting for you?

I like to tell people that I grew up in Winston Salem…that’s not true! My dad moved our family unit back to his hometown when I was in high school. All of my fondest memories growing up are of the time spent here with my grandmother each summer. My dad’s entire family (going back several generations) was raised in the Waughtown neighborhood in Winston, so there were always rich stories growing up of the places my family went on their Sunday drives after church, got their first jobs, or where they retired from long careers. I also have family who currently have made their careers in promoting, building in, and having a pulse on the Winston Salem scene. I try to put pieces of these memories or stories in every cityscape that I paint.

How have you evolved, personally, as an artist?

“When you know better, you do better.” This has been a personal philosophy and the key to my evolution as an artist.  I am constantly trying new techniques, taking new classes, and pushing myself out of my comfort zone; whether it be the substrate, the medium, the color palette, the tools, the hand I use to paint with.  I don’t sweat it when a piece doesn’t work out… I set it aside in my “morgue pile,” move on and try a different way the next time.  I am definitely not afraid to fail.

How do you carve out time to be creative?

While my children were growing up, this was not an easy task. Creativity was set aside for 15+ years for my roller coaster called life. Now that my two adult children have flown the coop and I am an empty nester, I schedule time in my art space. I like to take a few hours, one day a week, to organize the space.  It’s easier to jump into creativity when the art space is “clean,” but every week, I find the real momentum hits once it is a mess again. Surely, I’m not the only one?

What are you working on that excites you right now?

I am putting the finishing touches on a commissioned cityscape for my aunt and uncle that has really excited me. They gave me a list of buildings that were important to them to include, but I dug deep in the memories and found many other WSNC landmarks that would mean something to them and found places to tuck them into the piece.

What is one piece of advice you’d like to share with fellow artists?

It is great to surround yourself with people that believe in you, can be honest and support you and think you are a million bucks and did I ever hit the jackpot in that regard, but, what really matters is believing in yourself.

If you are interested in learning more about Holly you can check out her Etsy shop etsy.com/shop/hollyevanscreative/ and follow her on Instagram and Facebook @hollyevanscreative. You can currently see her work locally at Red Dog Gallery and

Black Mountain Chocolate.

 


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